The First Sunset of Fall, 2017

Sep. 22nd, 2017 12:19 am
[syndicated profile] scalziwhatever_feed

Posted by John Scalzi

Featuring an Amish gentleman on a recumbent bicycle. As all the best first sunsets of fall do.

So long, summer. You did all right.


Dept. of This I Believe

Sep. 21st, 2017 07:47 pm
kaffyr: (Deficiency weekly)
[personal profile] kaffyr
You Know ...

Sitting in front of a screen, fighting codeine-generated nausea and an increasingly bleak mood, listening to Steely Dan warble about crossing one's old man back in Oregon, pleading with an unseen authority figure, "don't take me alive" ...

... is not necessarily a shining example of emotional hygiene. 

Perhaps it's time to go to bed. 

Yes, I know it's only 7:50 p.m. 

WHAT??!?!

More about my Dreamwidth Style Woes

Sep. 21st, 2017 06:44 pm
dreamshark: (Default)
[personal profile] dreamshark
Maybe I'm doing something wrong, but my experience is that pretty much every one of Dreamwidth's "featured styles" is now broken in terms of being able to display very large images in such a way that they are viewable within the frame. I didn't try them all, but I tried about a dozen of them and the only two that worked were Ivory Alcea (the one that [personal profile] guppiecat suggested) and another one by the same designer called Starflower.

Customizing journal styles on Dreamwidth is not straightforward. I sort of half-figured out how to do it once before, and ended up with a customized version of Blue by Wiring for Motion. That's the one that abruptly stopped resizing large images and became unusable. I'm curious what other people are using and if large image display is working for you. Customizing styles is so freaking cryptic on this platform that I would guess most people are using whatever was the default when they signed up. But maybe I'm just stupid and everybody else finds it easy and obvious.

After trying style after style and finding them all broken, I switched to Ivory Alcea, but really hated the layout  (no sidebars, just a series of ungainly horizontal boxes with way too much useless white space around them). Then I realized that you can start with any style and then change the layout to one of 7 pre-configured sets of boxes, almost all of which I liked better than the "no sidebar" choices. That made Ivory Alcea more or less okay and took only a few minutes. What took 2 or 3 additional hours was figuring out how to tweak the various "modules," move them around on the page, and get rid of the ones I didn't want. So now I've got a format I actually like better than the one I had before. But I am not a fan of the editing procedure, to put it mildly. 

However, I now know more about it than I did before. So if anyone else wants to, say, use one of the pre-configured styles but rearrange/add/delete some of the optional features, I might be able to help.

Salmon Crested Cockatoo

Sep. 21st, 2017 11:01 pm
guppiecat: (Default)
[personal profile] guppiecat

Salmon Crested Cockatoo_7


“They put high fructose corn syrup in everything these days!”




Originally posted at stories.starmind.org.

Talapoin Monkey

Sep. 21st, 2017 06:00 pm
guppiecat: (Default)
[personal profile] guppiecat

Talapoin Monkey_1


The zoo called this a “talapoin”, but there are two species of talapoins, the Angolan and the Gabon. Not knowing what made them different, I went a-searchin and came across the following claim:


“Unlike the related Angolan talapoin, the Gabon talapoin has flesh-coloured (not blackish) ears and facial skin.” (from The Kingdon Guide to African Mammals, by way of Wikipedia)


Now maybe it’s just me, but it seems that the ears and facial skin or any monkey, whatever they look, would be flesh-coloured.


Crayola’s got a lot to answer for.




Originally posted at stories.starmind.org.

Sun Bear

Sep. 21st, 2017 02:01 pm
guppiecat: (Default)
[personal profile] guppiecat

Sun Bear_3


That feeling when you finally build up the energy to go climbing only to run out of tree.




Originally posted at stories.starmind.org.

Also dead

Sep. 21st, 2017 08:44 am
supergee: (mourning)
[personal profile] supergee
Harry Dean Stanton: the life of a Repo Man (or an apostle) is intense

Lotfi Zadeh: Fuzzy Wuzzy wuz a logic.

Len Wein: beloved comics guy

Jake LaMotta: lasted remarkably long, for a boxer

Lillian Ross: wrote a fascinating peek into that great big wonderful dysfunctional family known as
The New Yorker. (She did a deliberate Good Grief, It’s Daddy)

Stanislav Petrov: saved the world

ISO Rejects NSA Encryption Algorithms

Sep. 21st, 2017 10:50 am
[syndicated profile] bruce_schneier_feed

Posted by Bruce Schneier

The ISO has decided not to approve two NSA-designed block encryption algorithms: Speck and Simon. It's because the NSA is not trusted to put security ahead of surveillance:

A number of them voiced their distrust in emails to one another, seen by Reuters, and in written comments that are part of the process. The suspicions stem largely from internal NSA documents disclosed by Snowden that showed the agency had previously plotted to manipulate standards and promote technology it could penetrate. Budget documents, for example, sought funding to "insert vulnerabilities into commercial encryption systems."

More than a dozen of the experts involved in the approval process for Simon and Speck feared that if the NSA was able to crack the encryption techniques, it would gain a "back door" into coded transmissions, according to the interviews and emails and other documents seen by Reuters.

"I don't trust the designers," Israeli delegate Orr Dunkelman, a computer science professor at the University of Haifa, told Reuters, citing Snowden's papers. "There are quite a lot of people in NSA who think their job is to subvert standards. My job is to secure standards."

I don't trust the NSA, either.

Been on the Job Too Long

Sep. 21st, 2017 06:29 am
supergee: (guitar)
[personal profile] supergee
The real story behind “Duncan & Brady”. Arouses my distrust by not mentioning Judy Henske, but that’s probably just me.

Thanx to Metafilter

Bernie Casey 1939-2017

Sep. 21st, 2017 05:17 am
supergee: (mourning)
[personal profile] supergee
Late in the 1967 season the LA Rams were 4 points behind with less than 30 seconds to go. They blocked a punt and recovered it at the other team’s 5-yard line. Everybody knew they were going to throw it to their big gun, Bernie Casey. They did, and he scored.

He played only one more season, then did a book of his poems & paintings and went to Hollywood, where he had a number of successful films including playing the Black frat leader in Revenge of the Nerds. He was also in my favorite granfalloon, Star Trek, playing the Maquis leader Cal Hudson in Deep Space Nine.

ETA: In 1968 Joe Namath shocked the football world* by growing a mustache. Casey & Jim Marshall had been wearing them all along, but they didn’t count, perhaps due to lack of contrast.
*Shocking the football world has never required extreme measures. See Kaepernick, Colin.
bibliofile: Fan & papers in a stack (from my own photo) (Default)
[personal profile] bibliofile
Just took this back to the library, so I want to mention it before it drops out of my short-term memory. An excellent book, or as [personal profile] jaeleslie put it, "Theodora Goss is a fucking genius."

It starts in London with Mary Jekyll, mixes in mysteries (is Dr. Jekyll still alive?), suitably dismal nuns (caring for Mary's half-sister, Diana Hyde), adds in a bit of Holmes and Watson (on their way to another gruesome murder scene), further explores what Dr. Jekyll was trying to do (oh, and he was an alchemist, and they had this alchemist's society), and goes on from there.

It's not just one girl's quest for anything, though: there's the mystery of whether Mary & Diana's father is still alive. Mary tries to hire Sherlock Holmes for the task. There are other interesting people that they meet, especially the women. There is some science involved, and sexism (c'mon, it's the Victorians). A bunch of nuns trying to teach poor women some work skills to save them from sin, in suitably dreary conditions. And a couple of ghastly murders occur, too.

If this sounds anything like your cup of tea, READ THIS BOOK. Like Jae said: Theodora Goss is a fucking genius.

Why I Had a Good Tuesday This Week

Sep. 20th, 2017 10:50 pm
[syndicated profile] scalziwhatever_feed

Posted by John Scalzi

Because yesterday I got to hang out a bit with Alison Moyet, who if you didn’t know is one of my absolute favorite singers, both in Yaz, and with her solo work. We’d become Twitter buddies in the last couple of years and when I mentioned to her Krissy and I would be at her Chicago show she suggested we have a real-life meet. And we did! And it was lovely! And brief, as she had to prepare to entertain a sold-out show (and she did; the concert was excellent), but long enough to confirm that she’s as fabulous in the flesh as she is in her music. Which was not surprising to me, but nice regardless.

(Alison has also blogged about our meet-up as part of her tour journal, which you can find here. Read the entire tour journal, as she’s funny as hell.)

I noted to some friends that I was likely to meet Alison this week and some of them wondered how it would go, on the principle that meeting one’s idols rarely goes as one expects (more bluntly, the saying is “never meet your idols.”) I certainly understand the concept, but I have to say I’ve had pretty good luck meeting people whom I have admired (or whose work I admired). I chalk a lot of that up to the fact that while I was working as a film critic, I met and interviewed literally hundreds of famous people, some of whose work was very important to me. In the experience I got to have the first-hand realization that famous and/or wonderfully creative people are also just people, and have the same range of personalities and quirks as anyone else.

If you remember that when you meet the people whose work or actions you admire, you give them space just to be themselves. And themselves are often lovely. And when they’re not, well, that’s fine too. Alison Moyet, it turns out, is fabulous, and I’m glad we got to meet.

(Which is not to say I didn’t geek out. Oh, my, I did. But I also kept that mostly inside. Krissy found it all amusing.)

Anyway: Great Tuesday. A+++, would Tuesday again.


Stick Insect

Sep. 20th, 2017 11:01 pm
guppiecat: (Default)
[personal profile] guppiecat

Carol and Stick Insect_4


If you volunteer at the zoo (or get an internship), you might get to hold a bug* too.


* Technically, a stick insect is not a bug because it doesn’t suck. It chews instead.




Originally posted at stories.starmind.org.
guppiecat: (Default)
[personal profile] guppiecat

Prairie Dog_10


I will discharge it in either your straw-colour

beard, your orange-tawny beard, your purple-in-grain

beard, or your French-crown-colour beard, your

perfect yellow.




Originally posted at stories.starmind.org.

Cleavage

Sep. 20th, 2017 01:48 pm
supergee: (coy2)
[personal profile] supergee
New ordinance encourages pervy cops to check out the areola and the anal cleft.

Food! Glorious Food!

Sep. 20th, 2017 10:11 am
lsanderson: (Default)
[personal profile] lsanderson
Celene da Silva and her daughter Sabrina delivering Nestlé products in Fortaleza, Brazil.
How Big Business Got Brazil Hooked on Junk Food
As growth slows in wealthy countries, Western food companies are aggressively expanding in developing nations, contributing to obesity and health problems.
By ANDREW JACOBS and MATT RICHTEL

Nestlé Targets High-End Coffee by Taking Majority Stake in Blue Bottle
By MICHAEL J. de la MERCED and OLIVER STRAND
The deal highlights the continued hot streak of artisanal coffee, whose rapid growth and fanatical customer base have continued to draw big business.

Nadine Malouf making kibbe in “Oh My Sweet Land,” written and directed by Amir Nizar Zuabi.
Review: In ‘Oh My Sweet Land,’ Dinner Is Served. Don’t Come Hungry.
Set in a real home, an unnamed woman cooks while she relates piercing tales about the horrors in Syria.
By ALEXIS SOLOSKI

SQUARE FEET
The Food Court Matures Into the Food Hall
Food halls — typically a mix of local artisan restaurants, butcher shops and other food-oriented boutiques — are becoming popular as consumers demand more options.
By JOE GOSE

After a day spent hauling flood-soaked belongings from their home in the Nottingham Forest of Houston, Linda and Jon Fabian sit on their lawn with a few glasses of wine.
Harvey and Irma Wiped Out Our Kitchens. Still, We Cook.
America has never lost so many stoves and pantries at once, but home cooks are intent on finding a way — any way — to make meals.
By KIM SEVERSON

Yotam Ottolenghi on Creating Recipes and His Cookbook ‘Sweet’
For the British chef, author and self-described baking nerd, there is no limit to the number of times you can make a cake in order to get it right.


The world’s best chocolate cake? Maybe so.


Pistachio and Rose Water Semolina Cake
By YOTAM OTTOLENGHI
Recipes: Pistachio and Rose Water Semolina Cake | World’s Best Chocolate Cake

At her home in Tanana, Alaska, Cynthia Erickson and some young volunteers decorate a lemon-blueberry cake from a mix that she jazzes up.
In Alaska’s Far-Flung Villages, Happiness Is a Cake Mix


The store-bought box, one of the few dependable food items in a place of scarcity, is tricked out for dinners and fund-raisers by many a “cake lady.”
By JULIA O'MALLEY
Recipe: Mom’s Famous Rum Cake

These zucchini and tomato tartlets with a Cheddar crust, which call for turning up the oven to roast the vegetables, are perfectly timed for autumn’s arrival.
Roasted Summer Vegetables Tucked Into Tartlets


September’s cooler weather means it’s the perfect time to bake with late summer zucchini and tomatoes.
By MELISSA CLARK
Recipe: Zucchini and Tomato Tartlets With a Cheddar Crust

CITY KITCHEN
Fresh sardines, are delightful, and well worth knowing. For an extra flourish, it’s fun to cook sardines on large fig leaves.
Canned Are Grand, but Fresh Sardines Are Deliciously Simple


These small fish are healthy, sustainable and easy to grill at home, whether over hot coals or under the broiler.
By DAVID TANIS
Recipe: Simple Grilled Sardines

INSIDE THE LIST
Alice Waters
Alice Waters’s Grilled Cheese Is Not Like Yours and Mine
In her best-selling new memoir, “Coming to My Senses,” the chef recommends a French mountain cheese and homemade sauerkraut for a childhood staple.
By GREGORY COWLES

Jellyfish Seek Italy’s Warming Seas. Can’t Beat ’Em? Eat ’Em.


With climate change, jellyfish are booming in the Mediterranean, to the point that researchers say there may be little to do but to live with them.
By JASON HOROWITZ

Nathaly Nicolas-Ianniello, a former journalist covering ecological issues, opened NA/NA in the 11th Arrondissement of Paris in 2015.
A Life’s Many Acts Culminate in the Kitchen at NA/NA in Paris
The chef Nathaly Nicolas-Ianniello, a former ecological journalist, serves dishes like ganache with black sesame miso to adventurous Parisians.
By MELISSA CLARK

EAT
The Secret to Amazing Mango Kulfi Comes in a Can


Quick mango kulfi.
The idea that fresh is always better is both simple and false.
By TEJAL RAO
Recipe: Quick Mango Kulfi

ON DESSERT
The salt in the chocolate bits is the surprise, and it’s also the great reconciler.
An Ideal Sundae


Like many of life’s great things, ice cream concoctions are best when governed by rules.
By DORIE GREENSPAN
Recipe: Hot Fudge and Salted Chocolate Bits Sundae

Pinot noir grapes ripen in the Willamette Valley of Oregon.
The Oregon Trail
The latest winemakers to settle in the region are bringing new perspectives, fresh energy and heartfelt enthusiasm to the country’s most exciting wine area.
By ERIC ASIMOV
Page generated Sep. 22nd, 2017 04:28 am
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios